Broken Hill to Coober Pedy

For those that think the Outback in Australia is an empty wilderness, this is for you. This is a picture heavy blog, I offer no apologies.

There’s a great Australian Film called Last Cab to Darwin where Rex, a taxi driver from Broken Hill drives to Darwin. We’re going to do about half that trip on this leg. Watch the film, it’s a cracker and the scenery is amazing.

Broken Hill

We stayed in Broken Hill for 2 nights in an old Presbyterian Church. This was the only picture I took while in Broken Hill. It’s a big mine with a town in it, and around it, and beside it.

Church

We departed Broken Hill for Wilpena Pound Resort as our first of two stops on the way to Coober Pedy. It was hot and dusty and the horizon shimmered with mirage’s in both directions.

Mirage on the road
Mirage on the road

It was to be a 7 or so hour long drive. Due to the ridiculous and unhelpful placement of the Flinders Range of mountains between Broken Hill and Wilpena Pound Resort we did a pretty serious dog leg drive route around them.  On the way out of Broken Hill we passed the most massive solar power station I’ve seen. Apart from dust, the next biggest resource Broken Hill has is sunshine.

Broken Hill Solar Array
Broken Hill Solar Array

I am a fan of renewable energy efforts and take pics of the most significant installments when  I can. There are a couple more pictures of sites we came across later in this blog.

 

On the way to Broken Hill we saw a number of Emu’s at the side of the road, which I found very exciting, you may remember from the last blog. First we saw one. Then we saw a pair, then 4 grazing together. 4 times as exciting, excitement doubling every time. For regular readers of these blogs you may have detected a theme. On our travels we see something for the first time, it’s usually a singular creature.

Emu
Emu

Then later Australia delivers more and more and more until the enjoyment is palpable. We know it’s never guaranteed, otherwise we’d have seen a dozen Platypus’s wandering down the side of the road, which we haven’t . . .  yet. However this part of the trip did follow that course.  We rounded a corner and saw a field with maybe 6 Emu’s in it. I had to stop and take a picture.

A (small) mob of Emus, a mobette if you will
A (small) mob of Emus, a mobette if you will

Then a few Kms farther on this happened.

A Mob of Emus
A Mob of Emus

A field with dozens and dozens of Emus grazing in the sunset. I couldn’t count how many there were. I know it’s not easy to see, but every shape in the massive field is an Emu. This was as wide as the camera lens would go but the field was at least 4 times wider than this, all full of Emu’s.

At this moment I had this flashback. In the 1970’s in Northern Ireland there was an attraction called the Causeway Safari Park. My Dad and  Mum took us there once. I was in my early teens and I remember my dads car going through two gates, one closed before the other opened. At that time I understood was to prevent the animals escaping. We drove around a vast landscape, vast by NI standards, and saw lions and baboons and other exotic animals roaming the land. It was breathtaking. Return to the present and witness what we are seeing on our travels.

This entire trip around Australia has been like I’m in a safari park but it’s a Safari Park 3,500kms across and 2,500kms wide. The number of exotic  plants and creatures we have and will encounter in Australia is exponentially larger than the 4 lions and 3 Baboons I saw in the Causeway Safari Park. And my excitement and enjoyment and desire to learn and experience increased by the same scale. And, as an aside, my english teacher at Carrickfergus Grammar School told me you never should (or is that should never?) start a sentence with a conjunction.

And onward we go. And, in deference to my english teacher, I will try and promise to maybe try to almost never start a sentence with “and” again.

The landscape keeps changing, gradually and subtly. We saw cactii, proper big green eared cactii with spikes. Just like the movies. Then we stopped seeing those. There was a specific zone where they flourished and we had just driven through that zone.

Just past a small place call Olary we stopped at the side of the road to take a selfie of this unique and momentous place. I know it doesn’t look like much in the picture but at this point on the road, after 110 days traveling so far, we passed our 10,000 kms Vagabonding milestone. We thought it was significant that there wasn’t a marker, or a significant feature, just Australia in all it’s beauty.

10,000 kms milestone selfie

10,000 km Vagabonding milestone
10,000 km Vagabonding milestone

But 10,000kms is just a step in the journey we are on so after the selfie we jumped back in the car and on we drove towards Wilpena Pound. Love you Jenni, here’s to the next 10,000 and the next after that and repeat….

Port Augusta

We rounded the dog leg in Port Augusta and turned from South West and drove North West toward Wilpena Pound. There was a time constraint getting to Wipena Pound as we were camping and we needed to have our tent up before dark. This meant we stopped less on the road but as we knew we were returning this way, and had more time to spend on the return journey, we didn’t mind so much.

On the way we saw this stuff growing at the side of the road.

Alien Roadside Fruit
Alien Roadside Fruit

There were many spots where these yellow and green globes were growing wild. We didn’t stop but vowed to try and find out what they were on the way back.

Wilpena Pound

We arrived at Wilpena Pound Resort at about 4pm and after checking in started to set up the tent.

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They hadn’t had rain in Wilpena Pound in the last 18 months but 10mm of rain was forecast for the next day so I set up the tarp over the tent. I had a half hearted go at it as 10mm is nothing. We went for dinner at the resort bar and I must say it was pretty tasty.

This resort in an outstandingly beautiful location. It’s a giant natural amphitheatre that looks like it’s a wide low valley in the top of an extinct volcano. It isn’t. In reality it’s a natural occurring fold in the sedimentary rocks around the place that look like a ring of mountains.

Wilpena Pound
Wilpena Pound

We were to be there two nights and, as the place is so beautiful, we wanted to do one of the many hiking trails around the mountains to witness it in all its glory. We chose the Mount Ohlssen-Bagge hike, up one of the nearby peaks of not volcano mountains.

Mount Ohlssen-Bagge hike
Mount Ohlssen-Bagge hike

This hike is one of the shorter ones in distance but in the ranking range they use from Easy to Very difficult it is ranked as “Really, really difficult, don’t do it unless you are part goat”. As it turned out, only parts of it were worthy of this ranking, most of it was on simple trails as you will see. The rain was forecast for the afternoon so we packed our rain gear and set off early with the hope of getting up and down before it started, but that didn’t work out too well as you will see.

Mount Ohlssen-Bagge hike
Mount Ohlssen-Bagge hike – the start

We walked past a dry riverbed full of trees that had been washed down by floods

Flood torn trees
Flood torn trees

We learned that in this part of Australia the natural order of things is flood, fire and famine in cycles. Australian plants grow seeds that need fire to germinate. Other plants in the same zone excrete syrupy sap that catches fire easily and as soon as there’s a lightning strike the sap ignites and the fire ravages the landscape. On one such occasion recently the fire was so intense it burned the roots of the trees. Then, when it flooded, the trees had no secure hold and were ripped out by the flood waters to be deposited here in this river bed.  We had just started out climb and already it was fascinating.

Now that's a convenient staircase 
Now that’s a convenient staircase

Whenever we see a set of stairs now we need to take this pic.

Wilpena's top model
Wilpena’s top model

The views as we climbed got better and better. Then I posed for the Mountain Man shot.

Mountain man
Mountain man

However, coming down from this position was a little less photogenic.

This is about halfway up. The shapes of the rock formations in the peaks is becoming much clearer.

Halfway up
Halfway up
Faces in the rocks
Faces in the rocks

As we got closer to the top we began to see the features of the mountain close up. They had features like faces. Pretty ugly faces but I’m sure their mother loves them. After one of the more challenging scrambles we stopped for a short rest to catch our breaths and to take in the views.

Rest stop
Rest stop

We had a great view of the resorts solar power station and air strip.

Wilpena Pound Solar Array
Wilpena Pound Solar Array

The colours of the plants clinging to the slopes of the mountain here were striking at this time of year.

Autumn Colours
Autumn Colours

We saw loads of these balanced stones on the way up and down.

Balanced stones
Balanced stones

I’ve seen so many now I think I’d like to give them a go myself sometime. Watch this space. Although it doesn’t look like it in the pictures the final part of the hike was a desperate scramble over a shear rock face. But eventually we made it to this sign.

Only 400m to go
Only 400m to go

And a little further we got the picture to prove we climbed the mountain.

We did it!
We did it!

The views were pretty amazing. According to aboriginal folklore the “Pound” was formed when two Akurras (dreaming serpents) ate a large sum of people gathered for a celebration, which caused the serpents to be unable to move from their eating grounds. They curled around and formed the rim of peaks that surrounded this area. I much prefer this version rather than folded rocks that wore away.

Top of the world
Top of the world

But, observe the colour of the sky in the background. Turns out the Australian Weather Forecasting was as accurate as it normally is and the 10mm of rain forecast was going to be a full on thunderstorm and downpour. We heard the thunder rumble in the distance as we set off back down the mountain.

Thunder and Rain is Coming
Wilpena Pound

And then it poured and we broke out our wet weather gear.

Wet Weather Climbing
Wet Weather Climbing

The rocks and scenery took on a different and deeper coloured hue in the rain.

Coloured Rocks
Coloured Rocks

As I am not writing this posthumously you can assume we got down safely but I can say some of the more vertical bits were traversed by sliding down on our backsides.

On the way down
On the way down

At the bottom of the mountain, on the way back to the resort, there was a short trail with some informational signs. It was from these signs we were told about the fire / flood cycle. It was also on the signs I learned of the existence of “Meat Ants”. The very name is a bit frightening, there was a nest near the sign.

Meat Ant Nest
Meat Ant Nest

I am told they got their name as they eat the meat of dead creatures but I suspect different.

By the time we got back to the tent the downpour was really kicking in and the wind had picked up. The piss poor job I did of putting the tarp over the tent was paying me back. It had been ripped off one of the corners and was flapping around furiously and the tent was getting soaked. A couple from the neighbouring caravan had tried to fix it up as best they could when they saw the issue, which had stopped it from being a lot worse. The surface water was running around and under the tent as well. So, for the next hour or so, I properly secured the tarp and scraped a couple of drainage ditches around the tent base to keep us high and dry. It worked a treat.

Euros

The rain eased a bit. One of our neighbours got a fire going so I decided to try and do the same. Last night and in the early morning we saw these tiny kangaroos we later were told were called Euros or Walleroos. They were very friendly and inquisitive, also they were probably looking for a handout. A couple of Euros came over and stood by me as I was getting the fire going, casting a critical eye over my failing attempts to get soaking wood alight.

"That's not a fire!"
“That’s not a fire!”

Eventually they seemed to say, “He’s useless, lets go next door.”

"THAT's a fire!"
“THAT’s a fire!”

We went to the bar again for dinner and drinks and again it was delicious. We met another couple and got talking. The chap, (forgotten his name) was a geologist and was up in  the Pound on personal geological interest. He told us about the rocks around here and where we could get a picture standing with one leg in the Cambrian Period and another in the Pre-Cambrian period. Interesting as that sounded we had to go the next morning early so would probably never get that picture. It rained again all through the night, the tarp held up and the drainage ditches worked a treat, we were warm and dry.

The road to Woomera

The drive from Wilpena Pound to Woomera was again, around the unhelpfully placed Flinders Ranges and was to take about 4 hours. As it was  Monday we had work to complete so we were up early and worked for a few hours before packing the tents up and heading out.

Flinders Ranges
Flinders Ranges

We left about 10 am and drove around and out of the Pound past the heads of the Akurra and saw the mountains from the other side.

Head of the Akurra
Head of the Akurra

Remember the yellow and green globes shaped plants, well we stopped to get a closer look. They are everywhere. They look like someone has spilled them off a wagon but that’s where they grow.

Alien Roadside Plants
Alien Roadside Plants

We saw them growing at the side of the roads all the way down to Port Augusta and nearly all the way up to Woomera on the other side of the ranges. I’ve still no idea what they are. Probably alien forms of the balls we saw on Middleton Beach earlier on our trip. Documented in this blog.

Eventually we passed the turn off for Broken  Hill we had driven up a few days before, we were on a new road. The next town we stopped at was called Quorn.

Quorn Railway Station
Quorn Railway Station

Quorn is a familiar name for a meat substitute ingredient made from fungus and sold in supermarkets in Europe. I had to stop. This is a working railway station that has a tourist train that runs between Quorn and Port Augusta. The Pichi Richi railway offers full day or half day trips  aboard a restored steam or heritage diesel train on the original Ghan route between Port Augusta and Quorn.

Pichi Richi Railway
Pichi Richi Railway

I didn’t take this pic, it’s from their web site. Looks fun though.

The train station is also a museum and tourist office and has this old telephone switchboard as an exhibit.

Ancient Telephone Switchboard
Ancient Telephone Switchboard

In Ireland these aren’t ancient, they were still in use up to the 70’s. We left Quorn and followed the Pichi Richi railway all the way to Port Augusta.

We had lunch in the Quandong Cafe.

Quandong Cafe in Quorn
Quandong Cafe in Quorn

It is named after a plum like fruit indigenous to Australia. They had lots of produce made from local fruits and herbs. It is a very interesting place. We stopped here and worked for an hour before moving on.

As we drove down the main street of Quorn and back to the highway I spotted the sign over this place.

Films made in Quandong
Films made in Quandong

Onto the highway we drove and onwards to Coober Pedy.

Island Lagoon

On the road past Port Augusta and up the other side of the Flinders Ranges there are many pit stops. Some of the pit stop signs have a camera symbol indicating a nice view. The picture below is from one of those pit stops with a nice view. Worth the stop I’d say.

Island Lagoon and Erla Island
Island Lagoon and Erla Island

Woomera

A while later we turned off the main highway,  passed the famous Spud’s Roadhouse in Pimba and drove the short distance to Woomera where we were stopping for one night on our way to Coober Pedy.

 

Target Plane exhibit in Woomera
Target Plane exhibit in Woomera

Woomera Village is a working air force base jointly run between the British and Australian Air Forces. It was established in 1947 to develop weapons and carry out experimental and secret tests of rockets and stuff. Up until 1971 it was top secret. It sits in the vast Woomera Range Complex (WRC) where they tested the missiles. The WRC covers an area of 122,000 sq kilometres and it’s a no go zone. It’s one eighth of the State of South Australia and about the same size as England. We found another Survey Mark, really clocking them up now.

Woomera Village Survey Mark
Woomera Village Survey Mark

We were to stay in the only hotel in the region. The Eldo hotel which was formerly the headquarters for the European Launch Development Organisation. The rooms were old Air Force barracks and very basic and the food was awful. Easily the worst food we have had on our travels so far.

Eldo Hotel
Eldo Hotel

There are 4 barrack blocks, “Redstone”, “Black Knight”, “Blue Steel” and “Skylark”. These were all missiles developed and tested here. We stayed in Redstone.

Redstone Block
Redstone Block

There was a massive display of stuff developed and used here. In the morning we took a walk up to the display for a few pictures.

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Woomera Village Display
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Even seats are dangerous in Oz
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Thunderbird 1
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Rolls Royce Rocket Engine
Read this Zoolander - the Original Blue Steel
Read this Zoolander – the Original Blue Steel
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Woomera Village Display
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Woomera Village Display
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Woomera Village Display
Thunderbirds are go!
Thunderbirds are go!

Thunderbirds, the TV series created by Gerry and Sylvia Anderson in the UK began in 1964 and Gerry’s brother was in the Royal Airforce. Coincidence?

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Woomera Village Display

There were no frills in Eldo, which included no edible food, no Optus phone coverage and no WiFi. We knew we could get all three of these in Spud’s Roadhouse about 6km away so we planned to work out of there until lunchtime the next morning before driving to Coober Pedy.

Spud’s Road House

Working in  Spud's Roadhouse
Working in Spud’s Roadhouse

Spud’s is an institution on the highway. The late Spud Murphy started Spud’s Roadhouse in 1969. Pimba, the village where the roadhouse is located, has a population of less than 50. I’m sure nearly all have worked in Spud’s at one time or another.

Spuds Road House
Spuds Road House

The place has a petrol station, grocery store, general store, restaurant and pub.  Rex the taxi driver from Broken Hill stopped here as well on his way to Darwin. Spud Murphy died in 2007 but he has achieved immortality as a result of this place. Well done Spud.

It also provides good old outback hospitality as this sign shows. Its an animal trap.

Press here for service
Press here for service

Pimba to Coober Pedy was to take us about 4 hours. We filled up our bellies in the restaurant and our fuel tank at the pumps and drove back out onto the highway pausing only to snap a picture of this sign.

The Road to Coober Pedy
The Road to Coober Pedy

We turned right.

Lake Hart

The road to Coober Pedy is long and straight and goes right through the Woomera Test Range. It passes by the Lake Hart Rest Stop where there was a sign with a picture of a camera on it.  We turned in and were glad we did.

Lake Hart
Lake Hart

Lake Hart is a massive salt lake and up until 1931 was one of major sources of salt harvested in Australia.

Walking on Lake Hart
Walking on Lake Hart

It looks like snow.

Signs of the old jetty
Signs of the old jetty

There are signs of it once being a lake full of water.

Jetty Stumps
Jetty Stumps

I read that the Lake Hart stop is a popular overnight place for RV’s and grey nomads. There certainly were a few there when we stopped. I also read it is so popular you need to get there before midday to get a decent spot. I’ll bet the sunrise is worth it. The Ghan Railway line runs right past the Lake.

The Ghan Railway Line
The Ghan Railway Line

Coober Pedy

Don't Walk Backwards
Don’t Walk Backwards

We arrived in Coober Pedy about 4:30pm to check into our AirBnB residence. We’d booked a dugout, which is what the underground houses are called in Coober Pedy. The temperature in the summer months is so hot nearly half the residences are underground. On the surface it could be over 50c but underground it remains low 20’s all year round.

P6010244.JPGIt all started with Opals. Over 90% of the world’s opals come from Coober Pedy. The original miners who came here to drill for opals had a residency permit that came with their claim. After they dug a big enough hole in the rocks with no opals in it they lived in the hole and kept digging. There are a couple of hotels and churches that have done the same thing. More of that later.

Coober Pedy Dugout
Coober Pedy Dugout

Our AirBnB place was underground, in a dugout. It had 3 big bedrooms, two bathrooms, a laundry and an outside underground courtyard. It was magnificent. It also had WiFi.

Coober Pedy Dugout
Coober Pedy Dugout
Office for the week
Office for the week

The manager of the place checked us in and showed us around then left us to it. It was getting dark when he left, it gets dark early here. The sky was clear and full of stars. This dugout is about 4km out of town and it was silent and beautiful outside. We knew there was a firepit outside so while I got the fire going Jenni sorted out the drinks. We were going to have a drink under the stars in the middle of the desert in Coober Pedy.

Drinking under the stars in  Coober Pedy
Drinking under the stars in Coober Pedy

It was perfect. It took us a long time getting here but our goal was finally achieved, we had arrived in Coober Pedy in style.

Coober Pedy Attractions

Serbian Church Coober Pedy
Serbian Church Coober Pedy

I had researched a couple of quirky things I’d like to visit while I was here and we also asked the Airbnb manager for tips. The organised tours were out as options, we had to do a day’s work before we could go out and explore and most of those tours were 4 hours or more. The manager told us 2 places to visit, the Serbian Church and Umoona museum. Those two things along with our self researched items were going to be enough for us while we were here.

The Serbian Church

Entrance to the Serbian underground church
Entrance to the Serbian underground church
Norm Aston did the carvings
Norm Aston did the carvings

The church was built in 1993 by Serbian Australian miners.

Inside the Church
Inside the Church
Engravings and Carvings
Engravings and Carvings

The floor of the church is 17 metres under the surface level and was all dug out by volunteers.

Jenni praying it wouldn't collapse
Jenni praying it wouldn’t collapse

The painted glass window looks particularly impressive.

Stained Glass Window, Serbian Underground Church
Painted Glass Window, Serbian Underground Church
The carvings in the church walls
Norm Aston’s carvings in the church walls

It’s a pretty impressive place, unique and beautiful. Judging by the evidence we found outside it’s thirsty work digging out a church.

Thirsty work building a church
Thirsty work building a church

The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert

Coober Pedy looks like the surface of a foreign planet, and many movie location scouts have thought so too. One of the many movies filmed here was the Australian hit Priscilla Queen of the Desert. The name of the bus in the movie was called Priscilla and when we saw this unexpectedly we had to stop and take a picture.

Priscilla, Queen of the Desert
Priscilla, Queen of the Desert

Pitch Black

At the side of the main street in the middle of the town behind a toilet block, almost invisible and mainly forgotten lies a relic left behind from the film, Pitch Black.

The crashed Hunter-Gratzner from Pitch Black
The crashed Hunter-Gratzner from Pitch Black

This was one of my personal tourist draws for Coober Pedy. Most come for the opals and the experience, I came for this wreck of a movie prop. Not totally that but it was on the list of reasons to visit this incredible place. The only people who know about this prop are fans of the movie. I was very happy to get this picture, thanks Jenni for taking it, I look outrageously happy.

The spaceship is in the car park of an Opal  Mine attraction and we went for a bit of a wander up over the mine. This is what the health and safety guys put over the air shaft of the exhibit to stop people falling into it.

Coober Pedy Health and Safety at Work
Coober Pedy Health and Safety at Work

I’ll be willing to bet they only did that so they didn’t have to clean the bodies up every morning.

Umoona

We traipsed next door to the abandoned spacecraft to the Umoona Opal Mine and Museum, as recommended by the manager of our dugout. It’s an original opal mine and is a very interesting exhibit. It was a deep and large cave, on the walls were pictures of old mines and original machinery and the history of Coober Pedy.

In 1915 Jim Hutchison and his 14 year old son William were digging for water after trying to find gold and dug up an opal, 8 days later the first opal claim was lodged. The local aborigines called this place Kulpa Piti which roughly translates to “White Man’s Hole in the Ground” and from there Coober Pedy was named. It’s in the desert and it rarely rains, water is from a bore 24 kms away and is piped into the town in an underground pipe then cleaned, desalinated in a solar powered desalination plant and stored in a large undergound lake.

It may be dry now but it was once under water in the great inland sea. Fossils have been found from creatures like this.

Coober Pedy Fossil
Coober Pedy Fossil

And if If I ever think modern Australian creatures are scary just take a look at what the ancient ones looked like.

Prehistoric Australian Nightmare Beast
Prehistoric Australian Nightmare Beast

Coober Pedy Hollywood Sign

Across the road from the Umoona and on a hill overlooking the town is the Coober Pedy sign.

Coober Pedy Sign
Coober Pedy Sign

We didn’t climb up to it, I just swapped to the longer zoom lens and took this picture. It was getting dark again and you know what that means, back to the dugout for drink by the fire and watching the sun go down.

It was overcast the second night but was beautiful nonetheless.

Relaxing after a hard day
Relaxing after a hard day

The overcast sky had it’s own attractions. We were rewarded by this sunset.

Coober Pedy Sunset
Coober Pedy Sunset

The next day we repeated the same pattern, we worked from early morning to late afternoon and then went to see some sights.

First on the list this afternoon…..

The Coober Pedy Golf Club

Coober Pedy Golf Club
Coober Pedy Golf Club

This is from their web site: The Coober Pedy Opal Fields Golf Club has been offering a unique course for golfers since 1976.  The course traverses the desert flats and gibber hills of Coober Pedy.  The greens are black and the fairways are white!  Many a golfer have found opal whilst playing a round.  Golf is played year round on this unique course. 

The course was built in 1976 by a number of determined golfers.  It A few years ago a film crew had an idea to film a documentary about the Coober Pedy Golf Course and wanted a juxtapose position so engaged Alan McGregor, the General Manager of St. Andrews prestigious course in Scotland, the “Home of Golf”, to be interviewed along with Kim Kelly the president of the Coober Pedy course. During the interview Kim Kelly kept joking with Alan McGregor, “What about reciprocal arrangements Alan?” Alan McGregor joked back, “Well maybe if you give me an opal mine I’ll think about it” The next day Kim Kelly staked a claim in Alan McGregor’s name and posted a parcel with the claim and a handful of opals to him. In it’s 600 year St Andrews only ever granted reciprocal arrangements to one club, the Coober Pedy Golf Club.

Golf humour in Coober Pedy
Golf humour in Coober Pedy

There’s no rain in Coober Pedy, so there’s no grass. At the Coober Pedy Golf Club they don’t let that stop them, the players carry around a small square of artificial turf to play off. The one thing the golfers dislike is grass, it puts them off. If it ever rains and the grass grows they spray it to kill it. It gets too warm to play during the day in the summer so they play every Friday night in the dark under spotlights. It sure is an interesting place.

We stopped for a drink during happy hour in the Underground Bar of the Desert Cave hotel on the way back to our dugout. We got talking to a couple who where taking their friend from England on a road trip from Yepoon to Coober Pedy then onto Uluru. They had just arrived in Coober Pedy. The driver, who was a bit of a raconteur, was telling us of the drive along a 250 kms dirt track which was dead straight for 150 kms then took a hook left then ran dead straight for the rest of the road. He said, “It was like the surveyor had just worked out he was going in the wrong direction and Coober Pedy was over there. ‘Shit, turn left guys and keep going. And don’t tell anyone!'” I didn’t have the heart to point out you shouldn’t start a sentence with a conjunction.

Last night in Coober Pedy

It was our last night in this amazing place. We had no more wood for the fire but we still had drinks under the stars that night. It was getting down to 4c and the sky was clear from horizon to horizon, you could see the milky way as clear as anything.

Clear Skies over our dugout in Coober Pedy
Clear Skies over our dugout in Coober Pedy

It was a delightful end to this iconic part of our journey.

We’re on our way to the Clare Valley and back to Port Noarlunga. Thats for the next blog.

 

 

2 Comments

  1. Hi Jim,
    saw the comments on Broken Hill. There are a few items of interest around Broken Hill, The Pro Hart and Jack Absolom art galleries (I trust they are still there) as they formed part of the famous “brushmen of the bush” art movement that was in the environs of Broken Hill. A very interesting sculpture park in the desert and a trip to Silverton and the famous Silverton Pub. Menindie lakes area is quite picturesque (bigger than Sydney Harbour) as is the Menindie pub (Burke & Wills famously slept there). I do admit the Flinders ranges are much more scenic though. Great pictures of your trip, I’m following your progress every week.

    Liked by 1 person

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